Tag Archives: maine road

Manchester FA Frank Hannah Premier Cup quarter final round-up

Tuesday night saw some quarter-final games take place in the Manchester FA Frank Hannah Premier Cup. The semi-final draw also took place at half time.

Hyde United faced FC United of Manchester to see who would go through to the next round.

Droylsden FC also faced Mossley FC. Wythenshawe Town should have also played Trafford FC. However, this game was called off due to a waterlogged pitch.

Results

Droylsden Town drew 0-0 with Mossley. This game had to be decided on penalties. After the shootout was finished, Droylsden went through in a 3-2 battle.

Hyde United hosted FC United and lost 3-0. Adam Dodd, Tunde Owolabi and Louis Myers were responsible for the goals. Hyde also had a penalty saved. FC United are now through to the semi-finals.

Irlam and Maine Road are the other two teams in the competition. However, they are yet to play each other but because of league commitments. This will have to be played in January.

Manchester FA Semi-final draw

The draw was done last night after the Hyde and FC United game. You can see that on Twitter here…

So, Wythenshawe Town or Trafford FC will play Droylsden.

FC United of Manchester will play Irlam FC or Maine Road.

All semi-final clashes will be played week commencing, 03/02/2020.

Non-League: Frank Hannah Manchester Premier cup first round round-up

16 teams have been in action in the Frank Hannah Manchester Premier Cup this week and most games were very close or went to penalties.

Here’s a quick round-up of the games brought to you by The Football Manc Cave.

Radcliffe Vs FC United

It wasn’t the first time this season that these two teams have met at the Neuven Stadium and it was all to play for. It remained goalless until half time and when the teams came back out, Nialle Rodney opened up the score sheet putting FC United in front.

Soon after, Liam Ellis managed to equalise and Boro’ were back in the game. This only lasted for four minutes as Alex Curren then made it 2-1 to FC United. In the 81st minute, a Rick Smith header made it 2-2 and the game went to penalties.

Unfortunately, Boro’ has a bad shoot out and missed 2, sending FC United through to the next round.

Mossley Vs Abbey Hey

It only took 10 minutes for a goal in this game as Abbey Hey took the lead. Mossley’s Ben Halfacre equalised soon after getting the game even again.

Paul Marshall also picked up a bad injury that saw him stretchered off the pitch. There wasn’t much to report in the second half and the score remained 1-1. Meaning another penalty shootout for the competition. Mossley ended up winning the shootout 4-2.

Droylsden Vs Ashton United

The two teams managed to keep it even until half time but in the 62nd minute, Simon Woodford scores an own goal that put Droylsden 1-0 up. The rest of the half remained tight from both teams and that unfortunate own goal was the only one of the game sending Droylsden through to the next round.

Irlam Vs Avro

Another game that stayed 0-0 up until half time. It took 85 minutes in this game for the score sheet to open up and it was Caselle who put Irlam 1-0 up.

Frustrations got the better of Avro when one of their players was sent off in the 88th minute for a reckless tackle. The last minutes of the game were very dramatic as Avro also managed to equalise in injury time.

This sent the game to penalties and Irlam won after they saved Avro’s last shot.

Maine Road Vs Chadderton

Jamie Hill managed to put Maine Road 1-0 up after 38 minutes and all seemed well for the side until Dillan O’Connor managed to equalise in the 43rd minute.

Whatever was said in the Maine Road dressing room at half time certainly worked, as Oscar Campbell came back on the pitch and put his side up 2-1 in the 49th minute.

The game remained this way and Maine Road progressed.

West Didsbury & Chorlton Vs Trafford FC

This was another game that was goalless until half time. In the 55th minute, Grimshaw managed to put Trafford 1-0 up. This was until the 65th minute when they gave a penalty away and West Didsbury’s Barnes equalised.

74 minutes in and Trafford got themselves back into it, Curtis Miller made it 2-1 and a few minutes later, it looked like it was going to be 3 but it was ruled offside.

Trafford won the game and went through.

Hyde United Vs Glossop North End

There was a goal coming from the get-go as Hyde had a goal ruled out pretty early on for offside. This was followed by Paddy Lane scoring the opening goal for Hyde. A nice bit of play between Tongue and Dan Turner soon made it 2-0.

It was kept that way until half time, Glossop came back out and looked like they were going to get themselves back into the game. Ahmadi managed to head home a Samassa cross to make it 2-1.

Unfortunately for them, it wasn’t the comeback they’d hoped for, as Tongue and Dan Turner scores a third and fourth for Hyde.

Samassa also received a red card for a high challenge which probably came out of frustration, as Hyde went through to the next round.

Curzon Ashton Vs Wythenshawe Town

Another 0-0 game up until half time and this one took 67 minutes for some action and it was Isaac Sinclair who put The Nash 1-0 up. 6 minutes later, Wythenshawe’s Dwyer managed to equalise and in the 80th minute, things took a turn for Curzon as Brotherton’s header made it 2-1 to the away side.

Curzon’s Olly Thornley was stretchered off the pitch with an injury. The game remained 2-1 knocking The Nash out of the competition which comes as a big shock at this stage as they hold the cup from last years final in which they managed to beat Mossley 3-1.

Man City fans speak out on their main rivals

Rivalries are part of the fabric of football. Manchester City, I feel perhaps don’t have the strength of rivalries of some other teams. 

They spent a long part of their recent history, until the takeover, bumbling around towards the mid and bottom of the Premier League table, occasionally slipping into the relegation zones. 

Obviously that has changed now, with them now one of the best teams in Europe, however, they found themselves popular with huge numbers of fans for being the team that stopped Liverpool winning the league. 

I’ve heard several other neutrals say they, if nothing else, enjoy watching City under Guardiola play. It’s just such nice football to watch!

However, of course, Man City is not without its rivals.

The most obvious is, of course, Manchester United. Once dismissed as Noisy Neighbours when United was at their peak under Ferguson. Obviously geographically United are the nearest rivals, and this was more the case when City was based at Maine Road. Even with a couple of extra miles between grounds, the rivalry remains strong. The Manchester Derby remains one of the most iconic and anticipated fixtures of each season and has seen some incredible games over the years. 

However, according to a recent article by Rob Swan on Give Me Sport, Manchester City’s fiercest rivals were Liverpool. While last season, where the two went toe to toe for the title all season I would definitely agree. I think the history between the two sides of Manchester makes this a far greater rivalry. 

The main rivals

The other main rivalries listed according to this poll listed Tottenham, Chelsea and Arsenal, which I can only assume has been due to being at a level where these teams have been the competition for Champions League places and cup wins. 

I think for a team like City, what is most interesting is the evolution of these rivalries. I wonder what the profile of this would have been just before the takeover. I’m sure Manchester United would have been right up there as a rival. However, I remember seeing Everton as a team City always struggled against. This I felt came back to haunt me when sat on the front row of the Family Stand at the early part of the 17/18 seasons at the Etihad when Wayne Rooney thumped a first-half goal for the Toffees.

I also remember feeling the rivalry to other more local teams who have drifted out of top-flight football, such as Wigan and Bolton. Due in equal parts to their location close to City and their playing at a similar level to City at the time. 

So perhaps, with Liverpool holding the biggest chance to scuppering Man City’s title hopes, it is perhaps no surprise that they have inched ahead of United in a fan polled survey. However, for this City fan, it will always be United who I see as the biggest rivals.

20 Years: How It Feels To Be a Man City Fan Through The Rollercoaster Two Decades

Manchester City of 2019 are barely recognisable from the team of 1999. Twice on the bounce relegations are something fans could barely imagine nowadays.

In 1999 City were in the Football League Second Division, or for those of you young enough to not have a clue what VHS is – League 1. Joe Royle, who had made 99 appearances for City in the 70s was the manager, tasked with getting City into the First Division, or Championship as it is now known.

The ground wasn’t the behemoth that is the Etihad Campus, but instead Maine Road. Tucked away down terraced streets in the much-maligned Moss Side area of the city. Rather than the enormity that stands now in East Manchester, it was mish-mashed, expanded at different times, with four stands that didn’t match at all. The stadium isn’t there anymore, in its stead after a lengthy planning permission battle is some new build housing, with little evidence of what had gone before it, with the exception of road names Blue Moon Way and Citizens Place. However, I’m sure most city fans remember the iconic roof of the Kippax and the temporary stand which was not set up to deal with the west Manchester weather at all.

It may be rose-tinted glasses, but the last few seasons of the Maine Road days were the best days to be a city fan. The season culminating in a Wembley penalty shootout against Gillingham, two promotions on the bounce only to go straight back down, and winning the first Manchester Derby in my lifetime.

Many weekends spent in my dad’s golf, putting up with his bizarre taste in music, to watch city put 6 past Sheffield Wednesday, or indeed lose 4-0 to West Bromwich Albion defined my early teens.

We had inflatable bananas, and away fans didn’t sing “Where were you when you where Sh*t” they sang “City are a Massive Club” which had more versions than I care to remember but the one referencing Curly Watts as a celebrity fan was by far and away the best.

The move from Moss Side to Beswick to Eastlands or the City of Manchester stadium (it wasn’t the Etihad in those days) saw an unremarkable season, despite a strong start and hammering Bolton 6-2, we had tailed off by November and had little to talk about with the exception of another win in the Manchester Derby.

And so entered Stuart Pearce as manager and a long run of wilderness years for Manchester City, finishing a few places out of the relegation zone ever season, players like Samaras, Joey Barton and Sylvain Distin were on the books. It’s hard to see now that a midfielder in the side would moon the home fans while playing at Goodison Park, but that happened.

Eventually, money arrived, out went Mark Hughes and in came Mancini, out went mid-table finishes and into the Champions League spots, the big four of Chelsea, United, Liverpool and Arsenal now all see City as the team to beat. The exciting moments are not winning penalty shootouts for promotion but winning the Premier League in injury time and becoming the first team to pick up 100 points.

Out are the hard Psycho tackles which simply wouldn’t stand in today’s game, and in the remarkable touch of De Bruyne. No more feeding the goat and in with Aguero’s devastating accuracy. Veteran players are no longer the likes of Hamann, and now the likes of Kompany. Keegan’s determination would be no match for Pep’s tactical brilliance.

City have gone from noisy neighbours to one of the best teams in Europe in an incredibly short space of time (via an enormous cash injection). There is no denying that they are an absolute joy to watch, and when the wheels get turning they are incredible, the balls you think have been overhit have someone waiting at the end of it who has it in control and on the floor in one touch, carving up the defences of good teams, (lest we forget we beat Liverpool 5-1 last season) and utterly destroying lesser opposition as some of this season’s scorelines have shown.

I may be alone in this opinion, but I miss the difficult years. With City’s dominance is the expectation that they will win every single game, 15 years ago when you expect to lose everything, winning a game would cause utter delirium, especially if it happened to fall against a certain team based in Stretford. If you lost you weren’t disappointed because you expected to, you’d just sing “MCFC OK” even louder. Now I find myself feeling slightly put out that City might not win the Premier League for a season.

It’s been a remarkable 20 years for English football, let alone for Manchester City. Filled with both agony and ecstasy, and complain though I might about not enjoying their success as much as I should, I look forward to seeing what they do in the next 20 years.